Knitting Math for Wedding Present Sweater (aka Klimt Vest)

 

Klimt Vest Knitting Pattern

Klimt Vest Knitting Pattern

I am knitter with a mission: to finish my husband’s wedding present sweater before our first anniversary, a mere five weeks away. The sweater is based on the Klimt Vest from Jean Moss’ Sculptured Knits.

 

I am modifying the Klimt Vest pattern as follows:

1] Fiber. I am using Austermann’s Korfu.

2] Size. I knitting the wedding present sweater to fit my husband’s measurements in terms of width and length.

3] Sleeves. Since the pattern is for a vest, I am adding long sleeves, This requires modifying the armholes as well as figuring out the dimensions for the sleeves. 

KNITTING MATH

For those of you interested in understanding how to modify a pattern to fit your measurements or swatch, here’s what I do.

1] Knit and wash a swatch of the fiber I want to use. I recommend blocking the swatch. The goal is to get your stitch gauge for your wool and appropriate needles. 

2] Measure the number of stitches in 4 inches of your swatch. Then divide the number of stitches in 4 inches by 4 to get your number of stitches per inch. Note: It’s important to measure more than one inch since the tension, etc. may vary.

3] Divide your stitches per inch by the pattern’s number of stitches per inch. This result is the number that you use to adjust your number of stitches relative to the number of stitches in the pattern. If this number is less than one, you should have less stitches than the pattern. If this number is more than one, you should have more stitches than the pattern. 

4] Follow this process for all of the numbers in the pattern.

5] For areas such as the armholes and necklines and sleeve increases, check your results using Interweave’s The Knitter’s Handy Book of Sweater Patterns.

Note: This book is a great reference since it gives a very broad list of sizes and stitches per inch. This allows the knitter to check her math and to use their number of stitches for difficult areas such as the armhole.

Fortunately for me, the Klimt Vest has a 14 stitch repeat which had a multiple that was close to half of my husband’s measurement. Otherwise, I would have had to use part of a repeat at each end of the garment. This would have added complexity to my knitting. 

To date, I’ve knitted the back and front until the armholes. In planning the armholes, I checked my stitch projections against The Knitter’s Handy Book and made some modifications to simplify the pattern. (This pattern changes on both the front and back of the knitting.) Wish me luck as I start the armholes!

Submitted by Knitted Yarns Editor-in-Chief

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