Tag Archives: Doily

Heirloom Lace Doily Placements on Long Beach

 

Knitting on Long Beach, NY

Knitting on Long Beach, NY

After being stalled on the train home from Montauk last weekend, my husband wasn’t up for making the trek out to the beach. Instead we went to Long Beach which is about an hour from New York City. This still allows us to get out of the city and experience the sandy beaches of Long Island without the 3+ hour train ride. The downside of Long Beach which is a short few block walk from the train station is that there is no delightful yarn store in the middle of town like Purl by the Sea. 

Since the Heirloom Lace Doily Placemats are a gift, I am on a deadline to finish them. While I set myself lots of deadlines with my knitting, I don’t like to feel pressured to knit something. Life’s too full of pressures to add to them voluntarily! 

Despite this, I’m knitting like a fiend to finish these mats. I think that the second sleeve of sweaters and the second socks are boring…with this set of placemats there are 4 of them!

Submitted by Knitted Yarns Editor in Chief

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Shiri Mor’s Botanica Medallion Sweater from Vogue Knitting

   

Shiri Mors Botanica Medallion on Vogue Knitting Cover

 

Shiri Mor's Botanica Medallion on Vogue Knitting Cover

When I started knitting lace doilies, one of my friends suggested that I check out the pattern on the cover of Vogue Knitting Summer 2009. It’s an unusual pattern by Shiri Mor. It’s more of a vest than a sweater. It consists of a center circle knit in the round like a doily and a separate border knitted with a variety of lace stitches so that it is larger at the outer edge than the inner edge. 

 

Interestingly, the sample is knit in Blue Sky Skinny Dyed Cotton for summer wearing. Given the way that the pattern is knit, it is a strong candidate for a Noro type yarn which would add a wonderful pattern to the center and stripes to the outer circle.

When I first thought about doing the top, I wanted to combine several colors. I wanted to use the watery blues and greens that have been showcased in Eileen Fisher’s windows on Fifth Avenue this spring.

Due to the fact that I’ve been on a yarn diet (of course, those of you who are regular readers know that I allow myself yarn treats and occasional splurges like MDSW and Webs Tent Sale.)  Therefore I decided to use some Tahki Cotton Classic from my stash. The 4 1/2 balls of white Tahki Cotton Classic (or 432+ yards) that I got at a yarn swap  wasn’t enough to make the top.  Combined with one or two other colors, it was a good start.

Tahki Cotton Classic in White, Aqua and Blue-Green

Tahki Cotton Classic in White, Aqua and Blue-Green

After studying the Botanica Medallion pattern, I realized that it was difficult to adapt to multiple colors in the way that a vintage doily might be. Therefore, I bought 5 skeins of aqua at Purl By the Sea (or 540 yards) in Montauk.

Flower Medallion of Shiri Mor's Vogue Cardi

Flower Medallion of Shiri Mor's Vogue Cardi

32 rows of Botanica Medallion in Tahki Cotton Classic

32 rows of Botanica Medallion in Tahki Cotton Classic

While it’s a rare event that I get gauge (of course, I was using needles that were 2 sizes smaller), I set out to knit the  medallion centerpiece of the sweater. After knitting about 34 rows of the 54 rows needed, I realized that, while my gauge was on target, the piece even after blocking was way too small to work for me.

Given that the centerpiece of the Botanica Medallion consists of close stocking knit and reverse stocking knit, I chose not to increase the needle size to make the piece larger. Also, I am using 100% cotton which should be knitted tightly for garments. Therefore, I decided to look for another doily to use in lieu of the flower / starfish pattern medallion of Mor’s piece. 

Having made several different doilies, I estimate that I will need a pattern with about 70 rows. Although a pattern which allows me the flexibility to add more rows to reach my goal is optimal. Further, it’s important to take blocking into consideration. For example, my Heirloom Doily Placemats grew from 15″ to 17″ in diameter when they were blocked. I assume that the piece will grow about 10-20% due to blocking the lace (which is different from non-lace blocking.)

While some of you dear readers might be upset at this change, I am thrilled since it will allow me to use a variety of colors and to have a unique design at the center. I am thinking about making the border striped but I am not sure that I will like the color changes. I will need to test knit them.

P.S. For those NYC based knitters, Shiri Mor is teaching a class focused on making the Botanica Medallion at Knitty City.

Submitted by Knitted Yarns-Editor-in-Chief

Heirloom Lace Doily Placemats

Heirloom Lace Doily Placement for Breakfast 

 

Heirloom Lace Doily Placement for Breakfast

 

Heirloom Lace Doily Placemat in Cesari Wool

Heirloom Lace Doily Placemat in Cesari Wool

My Heirloom Lace Doily Placement project is half done! I am using a free heirloom lace pattern that I came across on Ravelry. I choice Liz Snella’s  pattern since it had natural breaks for color changes; also it has text and charts which are helpful.  

For color changes, there are areas where there are 3-4 rows of knitting which works well in the finished project. 

The one issue I have with the pattern is that a K3Tog is used where a slip 1 K2Tog PSSO would give a much nicer line which would be a good design feature.

While I am generally not one to make utilitarian projects or knitted items that require more than one, of late, I have been on a lace doily kick. My mind likes the way that the knitting goes round and round while the pattern slowly emerges.

I give a tip of my hat to Kay and Ann of Mason Dixon Knits for their exploration of ways to use your knitting to decorate your home and spread your love. With this project, I’m accomplishing both. 

I tried the Two Color Lace Doily which is another free lace pattern and knitted one and a half doilies but I found the pattern boring for what I wanted to do. When I tried modifying the pattern, I didn’t like it so I frogged it and started a new pattern.

In knitting, it’s important to know when to frog your work. I think that it’s better to frog something that you’re not happy with rather than let the unfinished piece nag you from the depths of your knitting bag. What do you think?

Submitted by Knitted Yarns Editor-in-Chief

Not Your Grandmother’s Antique Lace Doilies

Cestari Wool on Fair Harbor 

Cestari Wool on Fair Harbor

Of late, I have been drawn to old fashioned lace doilies. It’s not that I have a burning need for lace doilies or that I am redecorating every flat surface of my apartment with perfectly round circles of tiny little stitches of white knitting cotton. Rather it’s the way that the patterns emerge as you knit round and round. It’s the wonderful selection displayed on Ravelry and how others have used these designs in other areas such as baby blankets and shawls. 

As a result, I have spent more than my fair share of time looking at the work of other Ravelers who have shared their work online and patterns posted on free sites. While many of these patterns don’t have charts to accompany them, many of the patterns use only a small number of stitches which is relatively easy to chart. 

Using some wonderfully colored magenta, lavender and black wool from a small VA producer named Cestari that I acquired from a friend during a yarn swap, I am making a friend a set of 4 placemats since the wool feels itchy. It’s interesting that the wool still retains its lanolin which may be affecting my hands. I am using size 8 needles, double points at the center and then my Denises. The problem with the Denises is that there is a tendency for them to open. Fortunately, the wool grips itself so that I haven’t had dropped stitches!

Two Color Lace Doily in process

Two Color Lace Doily in process

Based on the lace doily in lavender that I made my friend Amanda, I decided that I would need about 60 rows to make a circular placemat. After looking through the lace doily patterns on Ravelry, I decided to make the two color lace pattern. I tried two times and found that the pattern didn’t lend itself to being adapted for my purposes, so I frogged two half complete versions. While the idea of using a pattern that was made for two colors was good, I found the pattern didn’t hold my interest. Also, it was ripply which I didn’t like either!

Heirloom Lace Doily - Do Over

Heirloom Lace Doily - Do Over

Heirloom Lace Doily on Fair Harbor Beach

Heirloom Lace Doily on Fair Harbor Beach

Instead, I decided to switch to the Liz Snella’s Heirloom Lace Doily. At the center, it’s similar to the Hemlock Ring Doily and Blanket. Since it has a couple of places where there are 4 rows of knit stitch, it’s good for switching colors. Also, it’s got both written instructions and charts. Being on vacation without access to a printer, I bookmarked the pattern on my computer so that I could use it.

Submitted by Knitted Yarns Editor-in-Chief

Hemlock Ring Blankie-Vacation Projects Begin!

Hemlock Ring Blankie Yarn-Silk Spun Cotton

Hemlock Ring Blankie Yarn-Silk Spun Cotton

Lately, I’ve been bitten by a lace doily bug. There is some about knitting round and round and watching the pattern slowly evolve. Perhaps its the influence of Marion Kinzel’s Lace Knitting Volume 1. As a result, I’ve been trolling Ravelry and the internet for vintage lace doily patterns. 

In the process, I kept finding myself drawn to Jared Flood aka Brooklyn Tweed’s Hemlock Ring Blanket which is a modification of a traditional doily pattern using a thicker wool. This pattern has roughly 2,700 projects on Ravelry! In part, I attribute this to the fact that it’s a free pattern and the recommended yarn (Cascade Eco) has a lot of yardage so that a project costs about about $30.00-$35.00. (Mind you this is a lap blanket not a full size blanket.) While I’m usually not one to follow online knitting trends, the Hemlock Ring Blankie has made it into my queue.

From a yarn swap last spring, I have 5 skeins of Farmhouse Yarns’ Silk Spun Cotton or 1,000 yards. It’s a thick yarn consisting of American grown cotton, American grown wool and silk. It’s made by Carol Martin of Hopyard Spinnery and contains 200 yards per skein. the label recommends using a size 8 needle. Since I’m making lace, I plan to use my 10.5 needles by Susan Bates in pink and purple which are plastic and have wonderful points. The yarn has wonderful names like Mint Julep for the green which is a blend of greens with a smattering of blue. Since this is a beach vacation project, the sun light plays wonderfully on the color. 

Hemlock Ring Blankie on 4 Double Point Needles #10

Hemlock Ring Blankie on 4 Double Point Needles #10

It turned out that the Hemlock Ring Blankie made a great vacation project. First, it becomes a relatively big project very quickly so being away where you don’t need to shlep it to knitting circles and the like is great. Also, the weather at Fire Island was cooler and windy than average for June. As a result, it was good to have a knitting project with a thicker yarn that could be worked easily. The finer lace shawls were difficult to knit between keeping the pattern in my lap and being able to work the yarn.

Submitted by Knitted Yarns Editor-in-Chief

Planning Vacation Knitting

Overcast skies at Fair Harbor Beach

Overcast skies at Fair Harbor Beach

This year, we’re going to Fire Island for a beach vacation where we both get to indulge in our hobbies. My husband wind surfs in the bay and I knit on the ocean beach.

In preparation, I plan out my knitting, especially since there aren’t any yarn stores on Fire Island in case I run out of yarn or supplies or get bored with my current project(s).  To this end, I like to bring a variety of projects that involve different types of knitting and materials. 

For me, beach knitting is great for zen knitting where you get into the knitting zone without having to think. I find that it allows me to relax. This can be good for complex patterns such as lace, long projects that require lots of knitting which would take months otherwise, quick projects that you can finish in an afternoon on the beach or more simple minded projects requiring little thinking. 

When it comes to vacation knitting, I  tend to over pack since I like having the option of changing projects. Vacation knitting is a great way of having a memory of your vacation in terms of the finished item. 

This year, I’m  bringing a combination of pieces. Since I’m looking to reduce the number of WIPs and my stash,there are some stash buster projects in the queue. Here’s what I’m bringing with me:

1] Fountain Pen Shawl (Source: Interweave Magazine 2009)- This project has been planned for outdoor summer knitting since I’m using black Malabrigo sock yarn that I bought on sale at The Point. Alyssa, the manager, inspired this project. After knitting the Shetland Lace Scarf, I had promised myself not to make any more black lace pieces until my choices for the Malabrigo sock yarn were been black or white (and I have tons of white yarn from last year’s wedding projects!). 

2] Nightsong aka Gail (Source: Free Online) This project is already in progress using a free pattern that I found on the internet for free. I used the comments on Ravelry to help me. I’m using a cobweb weight lace cashmere. Between the fineness of the yarn and the complexity of the pattern, it’s taking longer than expected to finish. It’s a present that’s due on July 1st which is definately going to be late.

3] Hemlock Ring Blankie (Source:  Brooklyn Tweed). I’m planning to knit this project in a cotton, wool, silk blend made by a small producer. The yarn looks more interesting than it is to knit with. Usually, I’m not one to jump on such a big internet trend like the Hemlock Ring Blanket but lately I’ve been bitten by the lace doily bug and wanted to use a tried and try pattern to better understand how to extend a doily. This project is a gift.

4] Mitered Top (Source: Vogue Knitting Summer 2009). This is a Norah Gaughan pattern which should have a broader audience given it’s great line. It may be the mix of yarns that turns some people off. Given the way that the top gets more fitted may hurt its following, at least on Ravelry. (Part of NaKniSweMoDo)

5] Grey-Beige-White Long Sleeve Top. (Source:  Basic seater top.) This sweater was started back in March since I wanted a hand made sweater for the spring. Unfortunately, I didn’t get it finished in time. The colors were perfect for the spring in an Anny Blatt/Bouton D’Or linen blend called New Jeans. I am knitting it in a reverse 3/1 rib with a v-neck. The project is crawling towards completion. (Part of NaKniSweMoDo)

6] More knitted doilies. (Source: Online) Using Ravelry’s search function, I’ve been collecting a variety of patterns to test using scraps and swapped yarn. (Recycle projects to use up yarn while creating something useful.)

When I started this list the Botanica Medallion top on the cover of the Summer 2009 Vogue Knitting and my Estonian Lace Shawl were in the queue but I decided to cut back a bit.

In addition, I’ve made sure that I have hard copies of all of the patterns and put them into plastic sleeves to protect them. I  also fortified my knitting notions to ensure that I have enough stitch markers and highlighter tape to keep my projects straight.

Of course, this is more knitting than I can do in this period of time but I believe that it’s better to be overstocked with projects than being bored!

What do  you do for your vacation   knitting?

Sumbtted by Knitted Yarns Editor-in-Chief