Tag Archives: KIP

Beach Knitting-Hemlock Ring Blankie Progresses

Sunny & Chilly on Fair Harbor Beach

Sunny & Chilly on Fair Harbor Beach

Beach knitting is one of my favorite forms of knitting in public (KIP). Unlike subway knitting where I’m filling time that would otherwise be unproductive, I enjoy being on the beach where the constant sound of the ocean kissing the shore is reassuring and peaceful.  With knitting in hand, I combine two of my favorite activities enhancing my relaxation. 

Unlike swimming, the benefit of having knitting on the beach doesn’t require specific weather conditions (although I am not a fan of knitting in the rain). The cooler than average June weather actually enhanced the experience since it kept the beach relatively deserted. Due to the slight wind (which was great for my husband’s windsurfing), I had to knit with a thicker yarn which translated to lots of progress on my Hemlock Ring Blankie. 

As with any large project, I find that the beginning goes quickly since there’s the sense of adventure and I haven’t had time to get bored with the project or an uninteresting repeat.  With the Hemlock Ring Blanket, the number of stitches per row increases significantly which means that progress is REALLY slow. 

 
Hemlock Blankie on Fair Harbor Beach

Center pattern of Hemlock Ring BLankie

Center pattern of Hemlock Ring Blankie

Green & Lavender Feather & Fan Rings on Hemlock Ring Blankie

Green & Lavender Feather & Fan Rings on Hemlock Ring Blankie

 

Despite bringing two sets of 10.5 needles, I still ran out of room to keep knitting. It became work to squeeze the stitches onto the needle. Thankfully, I have a set of interchangeable Denise needles at home so that I can extend the length.

Submitted by Knitted Yarns Editor-in-Chief

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Mitered Tank Top on Fair Harbor Beach

 

Peaceful Knitting Venue on Fair Harbor Beach

Peaceful Knitting Venue on Fair Harbor Beach

Norah Gaughan’s Mitered Tank Top from the Summer 2009 Vogue Knitting shows off Norah’s genius for designing tops with unusual shapes that are flattering for women to wear. At the bottom, the Mitered Tank Top starts with enough stitches on one side to make the bottom of most sweaters! It uses a decorative decrease to form a flattering line which I adjusted my knitting to ensure that it flowed through the waist band ribbing.

Among my modifications were:

  • Only used one color of cotton. It was a wonderful light green with slubs which are a godsend for those of us whose plain knit may be imperfect! I am not adding any glitter to the top as shown in Vogue.
  • Knit the waistband without changing needles since it made the top too small for my waist.
  • Made increases for the bust at the same point as the decorative decreases below the waist. I increased stitches on the outside of the stitch so that they form a decorative detail and look like darts!

Knitting on the beach in Fair Harbor, the wind and dampness hampered my speed but I had fun putting my knitting on the sand for pictures. Although for some reason, the colors are off in some of the photos.

Mitered Tank Top to Waist on Fair Harbor Beach

Mitered Tank Top to Waist on Fair Harbor Beach

Mitered Tank Top Back with a view of Atlantic Ocean on Fair Harbor Beach

Mitered Tank Top Back with a view of Atlantic Ocean on Fair Harbor Beach

 

Submitted by Knitted Yarns Editor-in-Chief

WWKIP-Brooklyn Bound

WWWKIP 

 

WWKIP

As a Manhattanite, I had a number of options for Worldwide Knit In Public day or WWKIP as it’s better known. Many of the choices involved sitting on the lawn of one of the many parks which I did a couple of years ago and got rather bitten. Instead I chose to join the knitters at the main branch of the Brooklyn Public Library at Grand Army Plaza. Since the weather was forecast to be overcast and potentially rainy, this KIP option offered a wonderful indoors alternative.

Organized by one of the librarians, WWKIP at the Brooklyn Public Library on Grand Army Plaza was a wonderful event. It took place on the plaza outside the library. There were tables for charity knitting and learning to knit. There was a raffle for lots of knitting books and yarn. There was also a live band and lots of people who turned out to have fun. Refreshments and the farmers’ market were nearby. 

WWKIP at Brooklyn Public Library at Grand Army Plaza

WWKIP at Brooklyn Public Library at Grand Army Plaza

View from Brooklyn Public Library

View from Brooklyn Public Library

Art decco doors to Brooklyn Public Library

Art decco doors to Brooklyn Public Library

WWKIP at the Brooklyn Public Library

WWKIP at the Brooklyn Public Library

Teaching knitting at WWKIP at the Brooklyn Public Library

Teaching knitting at WWKIP at the Brooklyn Public Library

For those of you who rarely leave Manhattan, the main branch of the library is easily accessible from the Eastern Parkway subway stop (on the number 2 or 3 train) which is one of the most beautiful stops. It’s got wonderful sculpture from the Brooklyn Museum which upstairs and the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens are next door. I was advised to use this stop since it means that you don’t need to cross Grand Army Plaza.

Submitted by Knitted Yarns Editor-in-Chief

5 Helpful Hints for Subway Knitting

 

NYC Subway Turnstile Entrance

NYC Subway Turnstile Entrance

For those of you who KIP (aka as Knit in Public) on subways and other forms of public transportation, here are some suggestions to help ensure that you make progress on your knitting. 

1] Always carry your work in a project bag, even if it’s only a recycled plastic bag from the grocery store.

2] Keep the bag hooked on your arm so that you’re ready to exit fast and don’t leave your precious knitting on the train. I have had fellow passengers hand me a run away ball of yarn.

3] Use circular needles since it’s easier to keep your work on them without loosing stitches. Also, they ‘re less intrusive and don’t knock into the people who may be squished into the seat next to you.

4] Keep pattern work to a minimum. Scarves and other relatively mindless knitting are prime choices. That said, I have learned to do less complicated lace patterns once I learn the rhythm of the pattern.

5] Leave your work at a good stopping place (this requires paying attention to the conductor so that you know when your stop is called.)

Lace Ribbon Scarf Knitting in 86th Street IRT Subway

Lace Ribbon Scarf Knitting in 86th Street IRT Subway

 Knitting While Waiting for the Subway at West 86th Street

Do you have any other ideas that might help other KIP knitters that you would like to share? If so, please add your comments .

If you like this article, you may also like my posting 7 Reasons I Like Subway Knitting.

Submitted by Heidi Cohen, Knitted Yarns Editor-in-Chief

7 Reasons to Like Subway Knitting

 

Grand Central Station Subway Sign

Grand Central Station Subway Sign

New York City subway rides can be long and boring, especially on weekends when it seems like at least one of the trains that you need to take is being re-routed for system repairs. I find that keeping a small knitting project in my bag is a great way to make every trip pleasurable.  Here are my reasons:

 

1] Helps make trips go faster. It beats cursing at the train that is running late.

2] Gives other subway riders a reason to engage with me. It never ceases to amaze me that people are more open to talking when you’re knitting on the subway. There’s nothing like holding a pair of sharp sticks to get a conversation going.  New Yorkers are very friendly, contrary to what you may believe.  You just need to give them a reason to start an exchange. 

3] Reduces stress. Instead of worrying why the train is stopped indefinitely at Times Square for no apparent reason, I can happily knit while others around me are getting mad. 

4] Allows me to make progress on boring knitting projects, particularly scarves. When the scarf reaches to my lap, I put the finished portion in the project bag along with the ball of yarn.

5] Amuses otherwise cranky children who seem are intrigued by the process of knitting. 

6] Influences your fellow subway riders to give you space, which can be a scarce commodity in New York City.

7] Makes me feel like I got a fun break because I had time to do something pleasurable in my otherwise busy day.

Do you knit on public transportation? If so, why do you like knitting on subways or other public transportation?  

Stay tuned for the upcoming 5 Helpful Hints for Subway Knitting.

If you found this article of interest, you may like my posting on airplane knitting,

Submitted by Heidi Cohen, Editor-in-Chief of Knitted Yarns

6 Airplane Knitting Tips-Honeymoon Knitting Continued

I always consider the knitting that I’m bringing on a trip, particularly airplane knitting, as an important component of my packing. Since carrying knitting needles and other sharp objects can be difficult in this era of Homeland Security, I give this aspect of my packing extra care.

To clarify, I take a broad view of travel to include air, trains, cars, even NYC subways (although that is whatever fits in my tote!).

Here’s how I prepare for my travel knitting (Please note, I have not traveled to Europe since they have increased their security about 2 years ago!):

Plan at least two projects in case one of them hits a snag or gets boring. An important factor is to have started the knitting or at least the swatching. (Of course, do what I say not what I do since I have spent many a trip merrily knitting away to discover once I have the luxury of space that my sizing is totally off!)

 Use plastic or bamboo needles, preferably circulars so they go through the metal detectors and don’t hit your neighbors. Also, I have bought less expensive needles in case they are taken away, I am not upset at their loss. If you really like metal needles, I suggest packing them in your checked bags to ensure that you still have them when you arrive at your destination.

Pack an extra set of needles in your checked bags. If your needles are taken by security, you can still knit at your destination. Also, this helps if one is lost or broken since it may be difficult to replace on your trip.

Take scrap yarn even if your pattern doesn’t call for it. It can come in handy if your needles are taken or if you need string on your trip (we have used my scrap yarn to hang our mosiquito net across hotel rooms!)

Pack your knitting tools with care. Make sure that you have sufficient markers, pins and needles. Have some form of yarn cutter that will get through security. I use a nail clipper. I have had scissors taken from me multiple times. (Also think in terms of weight.)

Use copies of your pattern and take an extra copy packed in another location. The aim is to reduce the weight of your knitting. In the confusion that can happen at various points in your travels, one copy may be lost, this at least gives you the ability to keep on knitting.

UWS Knitters Birthday Celebration

The UWS Knitters Group celebrated its 6th birthday and list mom Judy brought cake. Despite the less than optimal lighting for knitting, we camp out at the Starbucks on 86th Street and Columbus Avenue on Wednesday afternoons after 6.00pm.  The anniversary celebration brings out knitters who are no longer regulars or lurkers on the list. Being New York City, there are a number of members who are knitting rock stars and designers.

UWS Knitters 6th Anniversary Celebration 

UWS Knitters Party On

 

What I love about this group is its diversity and its acceptance of fellow knitters (of course, one must be able to at least do the knit stitch). Our oldest member is 91! Within the group, there is a lot of collective knowledge about the art of knitting and members provide a great sounding board for which fibers to use and how to interpret various patterns.

Let them eat cake… and eat they did! (At least, I got a shot of the flowers!)

Let Them Eat Cake