Tag Archives: Nupps

Swallowtail Shawl in Teal is Finished!

 

Lace Detail-Ella Rae Lace Merino

Lace Detail-Ella Rae Lace Merino

The Swallowtail Shawl in Teal is finished. I loved the Ella Rae Lace Merino. It was a very springy yarn which coordinated well with the time of year. 

After finishing 6 sets of repeats for the main part of the shawl, I decided that the 1 skein that I had wasn’t going to make as big a shawl as I had anticipated so I frogged it. 

In addition, I didn’t realized that the Ella Rae Lace Merino was really a fingering weight not a lace weight as a result, I had a few stressful periods near the end where I resorted to weighing my ball of unknit yarn to determine how to finished the shawl. 

Due to a limited amount of merino, I decided with the help of the team at The Point and fellow knitters not to make the nupps for the Lily of the Valley pattern and had to eliminate rows 13-22 of the pattern as well. That said, the shawl measured 30 inches by 60 inches and looks wonderful!

 

Swallowtail Shawl in Teal Ella Rae Lace Merino Blocked

Swallowtail Shawl in Teal Ella Rae Lace Merino Blocked

 

Swallowtail Shawl in Ella Rae Lace Merino Border

Swallowtail Shawl in Ella Rae Lace Merino Border

 

Swallowtail Shawl in Teal Ella Rae at The Point

Swallowtail Shawl in Teal Ella Rae at The Point

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Valentine’s Day Stash Enhancement-Ella Rae Lace Merino

Ella Rae Lace Merino in Teal from The Point

Ella Rae Lace Merino in Teal from The Point

For Valentine’s Day, I took advantage of The Point’s President’s Day Sale and treated myself to a hank of Ella Rae Lace Merino in their teal color way. I had been eying the yarn which is 100% Italian merino and dyed wonderful shades of blues and greens which seem to be popping up in the stores along Fifth Avenue as they migrate towards spring. 

Maybe it’s the desire for something new as spring peaks through the dull winter weather that’s attracting me to these colors that I don’t often wear.

Or maybe it’s dreams of the Carribean waters that we haven’t visited this winter…

Island dreaming - Nevis in Winter

Island dreaming - Nevis in Winter

Whatever the impulse, I bought the last teal hank. I hoped that it would be enough for a tank top but alas the hank has 460 yards which is fine for a smaller project, it’s not enough to try a cami given the fine weight of the yarn. 

Therefore, I decided to make a small shawl that I can wear through the changing seasons that can give my wardrobe a boost. I am using the Swallowtail Lace Shawl which I have been thinking about making for a while. Evelyn Clark designed the pattern and having made her Shetland Triangle, I know that she’s a great lace designer!

Evelyn Clark's Swallowtail Lace Shawl Using Ella Rae Lace Merino in Teal

Evelyn Clark's Swallowtail Lace Shawl Using Ella Rae Lace Merino in Teal

This pattern incorporates the Lily of the Valley pattern at the border so that it involves nupps but at this point, I’m experienced so that doesn’t seem like it will be a challenge.

Submitted by Knitted Yarns Editor-in-Chief

Triinu Shawl-3 Nupp Helpful Tips

I am really enjoying knitting the Triinu Shawl from Nancy Bush’s Knitted Lace of Estonia (Word is that it flies off the shelves of yarns stores.) The joy of this project is threefold: knitting lace using a fingerling/sport weight yarn, watching the unusual red/purple colorway evolve, and conquering Estonian nupps.

Grignasco’s Top Print is composed of a twist of three different shades of the red to purple colorway. When knitted, it’s like the dots blur to create softer color changes. Added to this is the normal fun of watching the colors evolve as the piece continues to grow.

According to Knitted Lace of Estonia, nupps prove that a garment is hand made since they can not be produced on a machine! Hence, long live nupps. Nupps as I have discovered can vary in the number of stitches from five to nine. In the process of knitting this shawl, I’ve discovered a couple of tricks to keep your stitch count on track. They are:

1] When picking up the stitches for the nupps on the knit row, make sure that the stitches are relatively loose.

2] Take care when purling the nupp stitches together on the purl side so that you do not inadvertently pick up a single stitch (non-nupp loop) on either side of the cluster of nupp loops. This can result in a lower number of stitches in the pattern repeat further on. To correct this error without unknitting multiple rows, I recommend carefully unladdering the stitch containing the nupp and the additional stitch to where the nupp is purled. (Note:  This assumes that you discover this error before proceeding to your next set of pattern repeat row-wise.)  Then use a crochet hook to re-purl the nupp loops. Then continue to bring the stitches up to your current row. Once you have done this, use the crochet hook to pick up the additional stitch and bring it to your current row as well.

3] Make sure that you purl all of the nupp loops together. Otherwise, this will result in a loop that sticks out from the rest of your knitted work. If you discover this loop before you proceed to the next set of pattern rows, you can let the nupp stitch ladder down to the nupp and use a crochet hook to add the missing loop to the cluster. Otherwise, you either have to choose whether to unknit your work back to the problem or (dare I say this) pull the loop through to the back of the work and carefully sew it in place.