Tag Archives: Philadelphia

F is for Fiber, Fiber Festivals and Fiber Farms

Overflowing basket of yarn at Rosie's Yarn Cellar in Philadelphia

Overflowing basket of yarn at Rosie's Yarn Cellar in Philadelphia

When it comes to writing about fiber, I could go on and on filling miles of online space as I’m sure many of you could as well. There’s the wonderful stuff that we find at Sheep & Wool Festivals that comes from the people who raise the animals or dye  it using a wonderful palette of colors. Of course, some of this may retain its lamby smell as the Icelandic lace weight my husband influenced me to buy at last fall’s Rhinebeck Sheep & Wool Festival. (Don’t worry–I have it well wrapped in a plastic bag to keep its small contained!) 

At the other end of the spectrum are the pre-packaged balls that colorfully crowd the shelves of our favorite LYS. For me, that includes The Point NYC and Knitty City. I love the fact that The Point clusters the yarns by brand and color so that they burst out of their baskets. By contrast, the yarns in Knitty City are packed into their cubbyholes and spill into baskets on the floor. 

In between are the cones of various yarns and mill ends that I buy at Silk City Fibers. They come in a wide variety of contents and the colors may not always be my first choice but they’re well priced and always become wonderful cherished items. At the core of my stash, there are some large cones of wonderful materials including mill ends of cashmere and cashmere blends (which I plan to make into amazing shawls since some of it is laceweight), some thick Chunky in Sweet Potato orange from which I’ve promised to make my husband a sweater (although he insists that a pair of socks would be much better), 2 pounds of black (yes you read that correctly) lace weight Italian linen which I will either make a shawl and/or mix it with a grey and white linen mix to make my After Dark Nightie #2 and a matching bathrobe from the first Mason Dixon Knits book. 

Alas, there’s too much yarn and not enough time to knit it all!  That said, I believe that it’s important to let the fiber tell you what it wants to be . It’s not that the fibers actually talk (that would be silly!) Rather, I find that it’s necessary to test some swatches and see what type of pattern works best for the yarn. For example, the spring sweater that I’m working on required several swatches to see what stitch would work best. I am lucky that I don’t find the math required to adapt a pattern to be a chore (although I would argue anyone can do this math but that’s for another blog post). Further, I am flexible and find beauty in a wide variety of fibers! 

I am a HUGE fan of fiber festivals. They are wonderful outdoor activities that allow knitters to mingle with other lovers of yarn producing livestock, spinners and dyers. The Maryland Sheep & Wool Festival in May and the New York State Sheep & Wool Festival (known as the Rhinebeck Sheep & Wool Festival) in October are the two that I attend. While they encompass a wide range of activities, I generally spend my precious time there focused on stash enhancement.

Calmly taking in the NY State Sheep & Wool Festival in Rhinebeck, NY

Calmly taking in the NY State Sheep & Wool Festival in Rhinebeck, NY

Fiber producing animals at Maryland Sheep & Wool Festival

 

Lastly, there are fiber farms. While I have only visited one, it was a wonderful experience that happened during the first trip my husband and I took back in the summer of 2005. Based on a brief entry in our guidebook, we drove from Lennox, MA to the middle of the state to Tregellys Farm. The owner was an incredibly friend chap who spent time talking about the farm and its wonderful assortment of animals including the heirloom equivalents of livestock. They also had camels and yaks.

Tregellys Fiber Farm in Massechuetss

Tregellys Fiber Farm in Hawley, MA

Llamas at Tregellys Farm

Llamas at Tregellys Farm (Of course, they may be alpacas?)

Fiber producing yaks at Tregellys Farm in Hadley MA

Fiber producing yaks at Tregellys Farm in Hadley MA

 

Boyfriend (now husband) & Camel at Tregellys Farm

Boyfriend (now husband) & Camel at Tregellys Farm

More fiber producing animals at Tregellys Farm in Hadley MA

Fiber producing llamas at Tregellys Farm in Hadley MA

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B is for Balls of Yarn, Baskets of Yarn & Bags of Yarn

When it comes to Bs and knitting, there are lots of choices. Living in a New York City apartment where space is at a premium (even with a stash-friendly husband), balls of yarn, baskets of yarn and bags of yarn rule. They are more of an organizing principle which is critical space is limited and stash enhancement just happens.

B is for Balls of Yarn. I have learned over time that it’s important to keep the last remanent ball of yarn for any completed garment in case repairs or changes are needed. It can be a snag or total restructuring when the garment grows in unanticipated ways.  I keep these colorful balls in an old glass jar/vase which doubles as a decorative piece next to our non-functional fireplace. Old swatches are also kept here since they can be unraveled in case of emergency.

Balls of Yarn stored in large glass jar as decoration

Balls of Yarn stored in large glass jar as decoration

 

B is for Baskets of Yarn. Baskets are another great way to store yarn in a decorative manner. Since they are out in the open, I keep some of my non-wool cones in baskets. I find that the serving baskets from catered events can be reused to create useful ways to store excess stash. (Please note that there wasn’t room to show the indoor tree.)

Baskets of Yarn-Another way to decorate with yarn!

Baskets of Yarn-Another way to decorate with yarn!

 

B is for Bags of Yarn. One lesson that I learned from the Carols with whom I knit that it is important to have nice places to store your knitting projects. They were upset with me for carrying my projects in plastic bags from the grocery store. (Mind you, I did use the green twistees to allow the yarn to be pulled from the balls.) Enter the project bags and supply bags. Here is an assortment of bags that I use.

One of my favorites is the metric tape covered bag where I keep my knitting tools such as tape measure, scissors, crochet hooks, stitch markers and needles. It’s hard to believe that I got it at Filene’s Basement!

Metric Ruled Tape Measure Knitting Tool Bag

Metric Ruled Tape Measure Knitting Tool Bag

 

I am  attached to the bags given to me by stores that I have visited when I have been out of town. Among my favorites are the off white bag from Loopy Yarns in Chicago’s Loop where I store one of my current projects and Loop‘s the light blue bag from Philadelphia  where I store my WIPs near the couch.

Loopy Yarns bag - A Chicago Yarn Store Souvenir!

Loopy Yarns bag - A Chicago Yarn Store Souvenir!

 

Loop's Blue Shopping Bag - A Philadelphia Yarn Store Souvenir!

Loop's Blue Shopping Bag - A Philadelphia Yarn Store Souvenir!

 

Then there are the cloth bags that my friend Vere Halstead made for me. I was lucky to get the yellow and orange island print. Vere works in the design department of CUNY and hopefully will set up an Etsy store to sell more of these great bags. I keep my special projects here!

Vere Halstead's Knitting Bags - Where I keep my special lace projects!

Vere Halstead's Knitting Bags - Where I keep my special lace projects!

 

Lastly are the big, extra thick plastic storage bags where I keep my unwound stash which aren’t worthy of a photograph since they’re stored at the bottom of my closet.

How do you store your stash? Is it beautifully displayed or hidden from view?

Written by Editor-in-Chief – Knitted Yarns